Canning Green Beans

Green beans are some of the easier things we have grown in our home garden. Being able to put food up for after season use is very important to us. Canning is the best way to preserve your garden’s harvest through winter. Many people choose to freeze for future use, but frozen beans only last a few months if not stored properly. They also lose their flavor and pleasing texture in a short time.

There are several varieties of green beans to choose from.  If growing your own, I recommend the bush bean variety so that you get a large crop at once. Pole beans tend to give you a few at a time over a season, where as bush beans come on all at once and you can preserve them in larger quantity. We use pole beans for eating fresh and bush beans for putting up for storage.

Make sure you remove the ends and strings if your beans have them. I found that our beans didn’t have strings. Maybe that is something they bred out of the commercial plants?

Be sure to review your pressure canners use instructions, and review my post on pressure canning before you begin.

Here is the process for canning your beans from the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

Beans, Snap and Italian – Pieces, Green and Wax

Quantity: An average of 14 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 9 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 30 pounds and yields 12 to 20 quarts – an average of 2 pounds per quart.

Quality: Select filled but tender, crisp pods. Remove and discard diseased and rusty pods.

If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read Principles of Home Canning.

Procedure: Wash beans and trim ends. Leave whole or cut or snap into 1- 3 inch pieces.

Pick one:

Hot pack –Cover with boiling water; boil 5 minutes. Fill jars loosely with beans, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Cover beans with hot cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Raw pack – Fill jars tightly with raw beans, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process in a pressure canner following the recommendations in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the type of canner being used. (There is no safe option for processing green beans in a boiling water canner.)

Table 1. Recommended process time for Snap and Italian Beans in a dial-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 2,000 ft 2,001 – 4,000 ft 4,001 – 6,000 ft 6,001 – 8,000 ft
Hot and Raw Pints 20 min 11 lb 12 lb 13 lb 14 lb
Quarts 25 11 12 13 14
Table 2. Recommended process time for Snap and Italian Beans in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 1,000 ft Above 1,000 ft
Hot and Raw Pints 20 min 10 lb 15 lb
Quarts 25 10 15

Some people like to can their green beans with bacon or onions or both. What are some good green bean recipes you would like to share?

Fermentation vs Pickling

When I first started pickling foods, I knew there were methods that didn’t use store bought vinegar. After all, I had fermented foods in my organic chemistry class. We made alcohol, sauerkraut, and root beer. So I knew it could be done. When I tried to look up recipes for pickles, however, all I found were vinegar “quick” pickles. Continue reading “Fermentation vs Pickling”

August’s Top Posts!

August was a slow month for the homestead, but I have lots of great posts in the works for September! Keep standing by!

20160808_212206-1-1.jpg Fermenting Eggplant - Trying to decide what to do with our over abundance of eggplants, I came across this recipe from Cultures for Health. I found the instructions sort of vague so I emailed their customer service and… More
20160730_190614-1.jpg Property Updates – 7/29/2016 - First off, let me apologize for being so out of touch the last couple of weeks. I have been completely swamped at work, and we had a death in the family, and I just haven’t… More
book-863418_1280 Fiction Bookshelf - Added some more books to my Fiction Bookshelf. let me know what you think, what books you’re reading, and if you read or have read anything on my list, let m know!🙂 Here is a… More
20160716_171743-1.jpg Spicy Zucchini Pickles (Paleo Friendly) - These are the first pickles I have ever made (aside from ketimun). It instantly became my husband’s favorite. In fact, it’s pretty much all he’s been asking for since our zucchini started coming along in the… More
20160716_105929-1.jpg Turkey Updates - The last time we posted about our turkeys, they were still living in the box. We had a hard time transferring them to the chicken coop, and we even lost 2 in the process. We finally… More

Feel free to let me know in the comments, if there is anything you would like me to cover or if you have any questions! :)

Fiction Bookshelf

Added some more books to my Fiction Bookshelf. let me know what you think, what books you’re reading, and if you read or have read anything on my list, let m know!🙂

Here is a listing of fiction books I have read and what I thought of them.🙂 Also, visit me on Goodreads!🙂 Click the images for synopsis and more information.  Jean Auel’s Earth’s Ch…

Source: Fiction

Preparedness Books

Hey all! Updated my Preparedness Books bookshelves for you. Take a look around.

“PRIVATE-SECTOR PREPAREDNESS IS NOT A LUXURY; IT IS A COST OF DOING BUSINESS IN THE POST-9/11 WORLD. IT IS IGNORED AT A TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL COST IN LIVES, MONEY AND NATIONAL SECURITY.” ― THE 9 11 …

Source: Preparedness Books

Freezing for Food Storage

I know I post alot about canning on my blog. Canning, for me, is the most sustainable and most reliable form of food storage and preservation of fresh foods. IF you have access to a reliable source of electricity, plan to use your frozen food within a couple of months, or only plan to freeze enough to get you through the next few days or weeks, then freezing your harvest might be a viable alternative or addition to your food storage plans. Continue reading “Freezing for Food Storage”

Fermenting Eggplant

20160716_111642-1-1.jpgTrying to decide what to do with our over abundance of eggplants, I came across this recipe from Cultures for Health.

I found the instructions sort of vague so I emailed their customer service and got some tips, so here is what I did for this recipe. I am bolding all the changes I made as well. Visit Cultures for Health for the original. Continue reading “Fermenting Eggplant”

Turkey Updates

wp-1464117886448.jpegThe last time we posted about our turkeys, they were still living in the box. We had a hard time transferring them to the chicken coop, and we even lost 2 in the process.

We finally were able to move them into the chicken coop and they have been steadily growing and thriving. You can see that one is definitely male. The other two appear to be female, so we think we may have gotten lucky after all. The dog managed to leave us the right configuration of birds.

 

Woodlot – Red Alder

aln-rub-5Also known as Oregon alder, western alder, Pacific coast alder.

Red Alder is the most common hardwood in the Pacific Northwest. It is also the largest species of alder. Seasoned alder burns warm, but fast. Wet alder puts out a lot of ash and very little heat. Alder cuts and splits easily with an axe, but will leave an orange stain on hands and clothes. Continue reading “Woodlot – Red Alder”

Spicy Zucchini Pickles (Paleo Friendly)

These are the first pickles I have ever made (aside from ketimun). It instantly became my husband’s favorite. In fact, it’s pretty much all he’s been asking for since our zucchini started coming along in the garden.🙂 Continue reading “Spicy Zucchini Pickles (Paleo Friendly)”