Canning Jalapenos (not pickled)

It was difficult to find a recipe for canning jalapenos that are not pickled. In the end I chose to can them using the same method as canning other basic veggies like green beans.

First you will want to review the Pressure Canning Guide, or your instruction manual for your pressure canner. Prepare your canner, jars, seals, and rings prior to prepping your peppers.

I canned my peppers in 1/4 pints because my husband likes to eat them with his Mexican food. Because most recipes don’t indicate the time for canning in anything smaller than 1/2 pints, and most veggie recipes only give times for pints or quarts, you will need to use the timing for pint jars for anything smaller than a pint.

To can my jalapenos, I sliced them into rings, cold packed them in jars and processed them as I do green beans.

Modified Jalapeno Recipe

Several varieties of peppers can be preserved with this method.

Hot or sweet, including chiles, jalapeno, and pimiento

Quantity: An average of 9 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 25 pounds and yields 20 to 30 pints – an average of 1 pound per pint.

Quality: Select firm yellow, green, or red peppers. Do not use soft or diseased peppers.

Please read Pressure Canning Guide before beginning. If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read Principles of Home Canning.

Directions

Procedure: Wash Jalapenos and trim blossom ends. Slice into rings 1/4-1/2 inch thick.

Pick one:

Hot pack –Cover with boiling water; boil 5 minutes. Fill jars loosely with jalapenos, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Cover jalapenos with hot cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Raw pack – Fill jars tightly with raw peppers, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process in a pressure canner following the recommendations in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the type of canner being used. (There is no safe option for processing plain jalepanos in a boiling water canner.)

Table 1. Recommended process time in a dial-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 2,000 ft 2,001 – 4,000 ft 4,001 – 6,000 ft 6,001 – 8,000 ft
Hot and Raw Pints 30 min 11 lb 12 lb 13 lb 14 lb
Quarts 35 11 12 13 14
Table 2. Recommended process time in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 1,000 ft Above 1,000 ft
Hot and Raw Pints 30 min 10 lb 15 lb
Quarts 35 10 15

Remember this is a modified recipe and is not a tested method by any regulatory source.

Below is another method that I didn’t see when I canned mine, but I may use in the future. This comes straight from the National Center for Home Food Preservation and is a tested method for canning peppers.

Selecting, Preparing and Canning Peppers

Several varieties of peppers can be preserved with this method.

Hot or sweet, including chiles, jalapeno, and pimiento

Quantity: An average of 9 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 25 pounds and yields 20 to 30 pints – an average of 1 pound per pint.

Quality: Select firm yellow, green, or red peppers. Do not use soft or diseased peppers.

Please read Pressure Canning Guide before beginning. If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read Principles of Home Canning.

Procedure:

Select your favorite pepper(s). Small peppers may be left whole. Large peppers may be quartered. Remove cores and seeds. Slash two or four slits in each pepper, and either blanch in boiling water or blister using one of the following methods:

Oven or broiler method: Place peppers in a hot oven (400° F) or broiler for 6-8 minutes until skins blister.

Range-top method: Cover hot burner, either gas or electric, with heavy wire mesh. Place peppers on burner for several minutes until skins blister.

Allow peppers to cool. Place in a pan and cover with a damp cloth. This will make peeling the peppers easier. After several minutes, peel each pepper. Flatten whole peppers. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to each pint jar, if desired. Fill jars loosely with peppers and add fresh boiled water, leaving 1-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process following the recommendations in Table 1 or Table 2 according to the method of canning used.

Table 1. Recommended process time for Peppers in a dial-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 2,000 ft 2,001 – 4,000 ft 4,001 – 6,000 ft 6,001 – 8,000 ft
Hot Half-pints or Pints 35 min 11 lb 12 lb 13 lb 14 lb
Table 2. Recommended process time for Peppers in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.
Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 1,000 ft Above 1,000 ft
Hot Half-pints or Pints 35 min 10 lb 15 lb

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